alan frost photography

in monochrome with occasional colour lapses

Posts tagged ‘Dell Quay’

Split toning a black and white image

When developing a negative film and printing in the darkroom, a split tone would often be applied to a black and white photograph at the printing stage. In doing so a photographer  could change its appearance to artistically enhance the feel and emotion in the image. I have never worked in the darkroom but speaking to those that have, there is a great deal of skill, patience, expense, not to mention trial and error involved to achieve the results envisaged by the photographer.  To produce a body of printed work  is even more challenging,  as this must require real dedication and a consistent approach to how a series of pictures are printed.

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Six versions of the same image – read on to see larger versions of each one

I greatly admire those photographers who still work in a darkroom and one day I may go on a workshop to learn more about it. For now though I am happy to try and apply these darkroom techniques in a digital world where the likes of Lightroom and Photoshop make the process so much easier.

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Early morning at Dell Quay

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Looking back through my last few posts it is evident that I have been doing more colour work recently. This has not been intentional and I am enjoying the variety, but monochrome is still my first love.

This image of Dell Quay, taken early one morning a few days ago, when the tide was very low, reminds me of why black and white photography is favoured not just by me but so many photographers. The artistic interpretation of a scene holds greater possibilities in mono than it would in colour. I enjoy the whole process of increasing or reducing contrast in certain areas of the image; thereby creating mood and atmosphere in the picture,  whilst providing a sense of depth and a focal point of interest.

Like so many images this one really needs to be viewed large as there is in fact a lot of detail in the scene. The masts in the boat yard, the three sailing boats to the right and a lone person standing on the jetty. There are also a few swans in the water and a gull flying into the frame from the right hand side. I have yet to print this photograph but I am looking forward to doing so. Do click on the image to enjoy a larger version.

Dell Quay forms part of Chichester Harbour in West Sussex. Designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, it is popular with sailors, birdwatchers, walkers and artists; in fact anyone seeking some relaxation in some truly beautiful and unspoilt surroundings.

A selection of hulls at Dell Quay

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Hulls come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes, but they all have one thing in common – to keep the vessel afloat in water. When not immersed in water the true shape and size of the hull can be seen. The three images in this entry each portray a different style of hull and they were all shot as the sun started to set at Dell Quay, a small sailing club and marina which forms part of Chichester Harbour.

 

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Do click on any of the images to see a larger version.

Just having fun – processing an iPhone image of Dell Quay

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Having ‘processing’ fun at Dell Quay

 

It’s very rare that I post anything other than black and white images on this blog. However sometimes it’s fun to play with a photograph, particularly if it’s one captured on a smartphone – in this case an iPhone5. Using a combination of Lightroom and Colour Efex, I made this rather moody, almost painterly picture of light falling on the sailing boats at Dell Quay in Chichester Harbour. Nothing is really sharp and the soft, desaturated appearance have worked together to produce a rather interesting and to my eyes at least, a pleasing result. It makes me think I should take more colour images and be a little more experimental with my work, but monochrome is still my first love. Nevertheless from time to time it’s good to play and just see what happens.

Do click on the image to view a larger version.