alan frost photography

in monochrome with occasional colour lapses

Posts tagged ‘church’

Churches Project No.22 – The Sacristry at St John The Baptist, Inglesham.

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Regular visitors to this site will know that one of my passions are medieval churches. The older the better and preferably with little or no restoration; preserving original features and in so doing retaining a true sense of history. I like to enter a church and be transported back time. To feel part of its story and to enjoy the peace and solitude these places bring to a busy and chaotic world.

For some considerable time I have wanted to visit the 13th century church of St John the Baptist in Inglesham, which lies to the north of Swindon in Wiltshire. Earlier this week I spent the best part of 4 hours exploring the church, finding compositions and releasing the shutter. This one photograph of the sacristy fully justfies the 200 mile round trip.  This is the only image I have made so far. In time I will process others and write a more in depth post.

My Instagram (alan_frost_photography) profile states – ‘An eclectic mono photographer with occasional colour lapses.’ This is one such occasion. The wall paintings date from the 14th century and in some places are seven layers deep. Just glorious.

Do click on the image to enjoy and appreciate a larger version which will open in a new window.

 

 

Three Norfolk Churches – a place to return

Happisburgh Church

Happisburgh Church

The county of Norfolk has many attractions not least the sheer number and variety of churches to visit. These three examples were captured whilst on holiday a couple of years ago but only now have I processed them to my liking. I sometimes think a trip to Norfolk specifically to photograph churches would be a great thing to do. I will add it to my ever growing list of places to take my camera!

 

Potter Heigham Church

Potter Heigham Church

 

Beeston St Lawrence Church

Beeston St Lawrence Church

 

Do click on an image to view a larger version which will open in a new window.

Churches Project no 21 – Idsworth, a church in a field.

Idsworth Church-4

St Hubert’s Church at Idsworth in Hampshire enjoys a beautiful and isolated position not far from Rowlands Castle. Sited near the top of a slope in a field the origins of church dates back to the 11th century. Nothing remains of the village and community it once served, deserted in the 14th century probably as a consequence of the plague.

The interior is charming and I have included a few images which I hope capture something of the spirit and essence of this rural place of worship, which I am pleased to say is still in regular use.

Idsworth Church

Idsworth Church-2

Idsworth Church-3

After photographing some interior details I stepped outside and was presented with a most wonderful cloud formation. It had been a beautiful late Spring afternoon and I could hardly believe my good fortune when capturing the scene at the top of this post.

Churches Project no 20 – St Cuthbert’s Old Church, Oborne

St Cuthberts's Old Church-3

This tiny church in Dorset was built in 1533 and has historical and religious connections with Sherborne Abbey, which lies to the west. The name Oborne derives from the Old English words, woh and burna, and means a crooked stream. Although the above photograph would suggest a tranquil rural setting, the church is actually sited alongside the A30, a fairly busy road between Yeovil and Shaftesbury.

St Cuthberts's Old Church

The rustic simplicity of the church and the lovely light appealed to me, which resulted in these two internal pictures.

St Cuthberts's Old Church-2

I am particularly drawn to the light but also to studies of one aspect of a church interior. I don’t wish to record or capture everything in the one frame, and for this reason the image above of the light coming in through the open door and illuminating the altar rail and step appeals to me.

Like so many of these small, rural churches it is no longer used for regular parish worship and is cared for by The Churches Conservation Trust.

 

‘Drawing with light’ – church interiors

The word ‘photograph’ is derived from two words in Greek. ‘Phōtós’, genitive of ‘phōs’ meaning light and ‘graphé’ meaning representation by lines or drawing. In other words a photograph is ‘drawing with light’.

Piscina of light

Piscina of light

This image is of a piscina, which is a small bowl used to dispose of water in services. It is often set in a wall, as it is here. In flat light I doubt I would have even considered taking a photograph, but lit by the sun coming through a window on the opposite side of the church, this simple architectural feature is transformed. The shape and texture are revealed and there is a depth to the picture which without the light would not be evident.

I am always looking for these brief moments when natural light is at play inside a place of worship. Here are a few more examples.

Shadows and the Cross

Shadows and the Cross

St Davids Cathedral-5

Hymn Books

Chancel step

Chancel Step

Warminghurst-1

Three Windows and a Pulpit

Candlelight in The Priory

Candlelight in The Priory

St Davids Cathedral-17

Light and Shadow in the Nave

I have quite a collection of this type of image, made over a number of years, so some you may have seen before.  Whenever I revisit these photographs, which have been ‘drawn by light’ I am always inspired to make even more.