alan frost photography

in monochrome with occasional colour lapses

Posts tagged ‘Bosham’

Bosham……Before and After in Capture One Pro

The new split screen view ‘Before and After’ view In Capture One Pro

Today Capture One Pro launched a free and very worthwhile upgrade to their editing software. There are a number of enhancements, bug fixes, support for new cameras etc, but in terms of the user experience there are two significant changes which I thought I would try out for myself.

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‘The tide is high’ at Bosham

Chichester Harbour Project-54

I have been wanting to make the above image for some time. The view is across the harbour from Chidham towards the village of Bosham with its instantly recognisable Church and spire reaching to the sky.

I often return to this particular spot when out walking but to get the result I was looking for, the height of the tide had to be at a certain level. Too low and there is too much vegetation…..too high and the posts are disappearing into the water. I do have the ‘Tides Planner’ App for my iPhone which tells me the height of the tide, so today I headed out with time to spare to watch and wait as the tide started to come in. I had also been cotemplating that a long exposure would enhance the scene and this of course would require a tripod, ND filters etc. Not the sort of stuff I usually carry with me when out walking. I am normally a spontaneous photographer but this shot was planned and thought about in advance.

Although a fairly bright day there was no direct sunlight which is exactly what I wanted. Too much contrast would have made life more difficult, so a little bit of good fortune was on my side. Welly boots on, tripod securely standing in the silt, camera set up with a 28mm lens, composition decided, hyper-focal distance set and after 12 seconds at f11, the image was exposed to the sensor. I checked the histogram which showed me no blown highlights and in truth a balanced tonal range. Ideal for post processing.

I sometimes wait a few days or even longer before I process my images but on this occasion I couldn’t wait, so earlier this afternoon I sat down at my Mac, fired up Lightroom and overall I am pleased the result.

Here is another image taken at the same time. I thought about placing the posts in the centre of the frame but I rather like the fact they are offset to the left and lie on ‘the rule of thirds’. Placing them in the centre was a little too obvious.

And lastly another image of Bosham taken yesterday from a different position on the shoreline. This time at low tide.

All of these photographs are being added to my ‘Chichester Harbour’ project portfolio and when I get the time I will upload a gallery to this site.

Do click on an image to view a larger version.

Private Jetty at Bosham – and thoughts on split tone presets for a b&w image

Firstly some background information about this shot. Bosham (pronounced Bozzum) is arguably the most picturesque sailing village (read tourist honeypot) forming part of Chichester Harbour. Regular readers will know that a current project of mine is to photograph this area but in trying to do so I am very keen to avoid the typical picture postcard view.

Everyone who visits Bosham takes out their camera and posts their results on social media for all to see. They are mostly in colour and feature the church from across the water with a few boats in the foreground for good measure. If the sun is setting, then this is a further attraction, as it’s unquestionably a great place to be at the end of the day. (Scroll down to the end of this entry to see an example)

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Bosham harbour at dusk

Bosham at Dusk

 

Bosham is a very pretty village forming part of Chichester Harbour, not far from the City of Chichester along the South Coast in West Sussex.

As you can probably imagine its picturesque appearance attracts numerous visitors throughout the year, as well as many a photographer. It’s a location that when the weather, light and the tide are all right, you may not find you are on your own with a camera. This is one of those scenes which has to be part of your photo library but I am all too aware that thousands of people before me will have been there and taken pictures of the setting sun; however it is too beautiful to dismiss just because of its popularity.  In fact if it wasn’t for the tide then the tripod holes where I was standing to take this image would be very evident! Despite all of these comments it’s a scene that is hard to resist even if it lacks originality.

This was one of those rare occasions when my Leica M9-P and 90mm lens were attached to a tripod. The exposure time was several seconds long, as the there was little or no light to speak of and I wanted a slow exposure to smooth the water in the foreground and introduce a little movement in the veil of clouds over the church spire. The fact that lights in the houses fronting the water were just being switched on adds another element of interest to the shot.

For those of you who are not familiar with this area, you might like to know that Bosham is in fact pronounced ‘Bozam’ and not ‘Bosh-ham’.

 

Do click on the image to view a larger version which will open in a new window.

Frosty morning looking towards Bosham

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Although I am often awake early, I have to profess that getting up and heading out with the specific intention of taking photographs is not one of my strong points. Probably because up until recently I would either have to get ready and go to work or walk the dog, neither of which are conducive to taking pictures. Now my circumstances have changed; I took early retirement in April, there are more opportunities to venture out, particularly at this time of year when it doesn’t get light until nearly 8 o’clock.

Earlier this week the weather forecast predicted cold nights and a harsh frost. That was enough to persuade me to put on some warm clothes and enjoy a crisp cold morning with my camera.

This is just one of a number of images from that outing. A view towards Bosham Church from the foopath at Chidham. The sun had just risen and it wouldn’t be long before the heat of the sun would melt the frost. After about an hour in glorious surroundings it was time to return home, but it did convince me that I need to get up and get out with my camera more often!