alan frost photography

in monochrome with occasional colour lapses

Posts tagged ‘colour’

Fuji X100v – a little colour persuasion

Ever since I acquired my new Fuji X100v I have wanted to experiment, or to use a better expression – play with colour! I have to say the combination of the camera and processing the images in Capture One Pro has been quite liberating.

Don’t get me wrong my first love is monochrome and probably always will be, but exploring the world of colour is another avenue I have always wanted to follow and now I feel in a position to do so.

It’s not just the camera and software combination, but a feeling that in these times of Coronavirus and Lock-down across large parts of the world, including my home country, we all need a little good cheer to brighten our day. I am the first to admit my black and white photographs can be a little sombre, even melancholy. They may reflect the times we are living through but what better than some colour and lovely early morning light to warm the soul.

These three images were taken this morning on our daily walk with the dog. It turned out to be some of the best light of the day. How fortunate we are that we can reach such a beautiful place from our front door, take photographs and then share them with others from the comfort of home.

Keep well and stay safe wherever you are.

St Catherine’s Chapel – from picture postcard to a more dramatic view

In this post I thought it might interest those who read my blog to illustrate my approach to capturing a well known landmark and how I come to make a few images which become my take on a much photographed location.

One such famous landmark is St Catherine’s Chapel on the outskirts of Abbotsbury in Dorset. Perched high on a hill overlooking the Jurassic coastline it is very visible from the surrounding hills. The colour image is arguably the ‘straight’ picture postcard shot. A perfectly pleasing image, technically sound, but nothing out of the ordinary.

Convert the same image into black and white, and after a little processing in Lightroom and Silver Efex (my go to software for mono work) and the Chapel instantly has a more dramatic appearance. In my opinion still nothing special, but the sky is more a feature of the shot.

The third shot and a very different composition, this time a portrait. The wispy clouds above the chapel are all important but somehow I still don’t think it is the best shot in this sequence.

Finally, I moved in much closer to the chapel using a wide angle lens. As a consequence the building now dominates the frame and the converging lines of the buttresses give a sense of height and mass. This is complemented by the clouds which are a wonderful backdrop to the harsh lines and solid golden buff limestone structure of the chapel itself. The surrounding landscape has been excluded, so this image no longer provides a sense of place, but as a photograph it’s my favourite of the four. Would it be your choice as well? Certainly the most dramatic, and no longer the picture postcard view which I am always keen to avoid if at all possible.

The chapel is thought to have been built in the late 14th Century by the monks of nearby Abbotsbury Abbey. It was used as a place of pilgrimage; its isolated setting allowing monks to withdraw from the monastery during Lent for private prayer and meditation. As it can be seen from the sea it would also have served as a beacon after the Dissolution.

 

Do click on any of the images to view a larger version.

Whitesands Bay – The magical Golden Hour

17.09.47 – The Golden Hour begins

 

In the past couple of months I have been making more use of my Instagram account (@arfrost) and on it my profile reads – ‘A monochrome photographer with occasional colour lapses’. I think this sums up my approach to photography rather well, and this post is just that, a lapse into colour.

For many landscape photographers the ‘Golden Hour’ at the beginning or at the end of the day is one of the most popular times to be out with a camera. This set of images demonstrates rather well the reason why it can be a magical experience. The colour of the light is constantly changing and arguably the longer you wait, the greater the reward is likely to be.

 

17.24.03 Showing Potential

 

All of these images were taken from more or less the same position, looking out over Whitesands Bay in Pembrokeshire back in February this year. The first frame was taken at 17.10hrs and the last at just before 18.00hrs, a difference of just 50 minutes.

 

17.44.46 Jogger at dusk

 

17.54.10 Forty five minutes after the first frame

 

17.58.11 The Magical Golden Hour

 

As well as the glorious colour palettes the inclusion of people and in some cases their dogs as well, adds human interest to three of the five images, which appeals to me.

If you happen to find yourself in a wonderful location when the day is drawing to a close, and assuming you have the time to sit or stand and just wait; then there is no greater pleasure than to enjoy the ‘Golden Hour’. Whether you have a camera with you or not, the experience is hard to beat.

 

The beauty of Easter flowers in Fishbourne Church

Irrespective of whether or not you are a regular church goer, the flowers arrangements on display this Easter at Fishbourne Church, near Chichester, were simply quite beautiful. The way in which flowers have been chosen to complement the images depicting ‘The Stations of The Cross’ is thoughtful and artistic. The hard work by a handful of people has to be admired.

Do click on one of the images to view a larger version, and then scroll through all the photographs in the lightbox.